Welcome to St Lukes Medical Centre

   CORNERSTONE® ACCREDITED GENERAL PRACTICE

Doctors-Mole Mapping- Immigration panel 

Pharmacy – Physiotherapist / Acupuncture 

 WE ARE SPECIALIZED IN:

MOLE MAPPING & REMOVALS BY EXPERT MELANOMA DOCTOR

IMMIGRATION MEDICAL PANEL physicians

St Lukes Medical Centre(formerly Radius Medical St Lukes) welcomes new patients and extends an especially warm welcome to those new to New Zealand. We are a General Practice consisting of 1 female and 1 male GPs with a variety of specializations.
Enroll with us – free of charge! We recommend you enroll with us. To enroll for free download our Enrollment form,Click here to download our enrollment form.  sign and send back (via email, fax, post or in-person) to us with a copy of your passport, citizenship certificate or work visa. This also entitles you to reduced consultation fees at all White Cross A & M CENTER.

Please text your full name, DOB and BRIEF TEXT to 021 815 110 to book an appointment

Notice :

 MOLE MAP SPECIAL GOING ON PLEASE CONTACT CLINIC FOR DETAILS

Medical Care

 

              Our People

Dr Bashir Ahmed
MBBS, FRNZCGP, Certificate in Dermoscopy (MoleMap) and Minor Surgery
Dr Mahlaqa Husain MBBS, FRNZCGP, General Practitioner, women’s health, paediatric medicine

 Make an appointment today

Opening Hours

Mon to Fri  :  9:00 am to 6:00 pm

Saturday    :   9:00 am to 1.00 pm

Sunday      :  10.00 am to  12.00 pm

ENROLLMENT form

Click here to download our enrolment form.

Please complete and fax, post or scan & email back to us with a copy of your passport, citizenship certificate or valid work visa.

Fax –  09 8150838

Email – stlukesmanager@gmail.com

Text for appointment

Please text your full name, DOB and a BRIEF TEXT to 021 815 110 – we will call you back to schedule your appointment. (Note: text for appointments only, not for medical advice).

Call our land line 09 815 1124 to book appointments.

After hours care please visit White Cross Accident and Medical Care ( 52 St Lukes Road, Ph- 09 8153111) or Auckland Hospital or please call health line on 0800611116. All call will be answered by a trained professional who can make arrangements for appropriate consultation and treatment

Yes ! We are open 7 days a week to extend care to our patients.

 

            Mole Mapping


 

What are moles and why these have to be treated? Moles can be genetic and are often brought out by sun exposure. Most moles are innocent, but some are more unstable and may be associated with melanoma. New zealand has the highest rate of melanoma in the world. Mole mapping is very important to detect the melanoma or skin cancer. Mole check is a good programme for the people with high risk of skin cancer. Mole mapping involves marking spots/moles by a skin specialist or by automated machine. We advise checking moles every 6 months, or sooner if a mole looks like it is changing.

Worldwide skin cancer is the most common cancer in both men and women. Skin cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the skin. The skin is the body’s largest organ. It is a physical barrier that protects your body against the environmental factors such as cold, heat, sunlight, injury, and infection. Skin also helps control body temperature and stores water, fat, and vitamin D. The skin has several layers, but the two main layers are the epidermis (superficial protective layer) and the dermis (deeper functional layer). The three most common skin cancers are basal cell cancer, squamous cell cancer, and melanoma.

Melanoma

Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes. Such cells are found predominantly in skin, but are also found in the bowel and the eye (see uveal melanoma). Melanoma is one of the less common types of skin cancer, but causes the majority (75%) of skin cancer related deaths. Melanocytes are normally present in skin, being responsible for the production of the dark pigment melanin. Despite many years of intensive laboratory and clinical research, early surgical resection of thin tumors still gives the greatest chance of cure. Around 60,000 new cases of invasive melanoma are diagnosed in the United States each year, more frequently in males and in Caucasians. It is more common in Caucasian populations living in sunny climates than in other groups, or in those who use tanning salons. According to a WHO report about 48,000 melanoma related deaths occur worldwide per year. The treatment includes surgical removal of the tumor, adjuvant treatment, chemo- and immunotherapy, or radiation therapy.

Around 60,000 new cases of invasive melanoma are diagnosed in the United States each year, more frequently in males and in Caucasians. It is more common in Caucasian populations living in sunny climates than in other groups, or in those who use tanning salons. According to a WHO report about 48,000 melanoma related deaths occur worldwide per year. The treatment includes surgical removal of the tumor, adjuvant treatment, chemo- and immunotherapy, or radiation therapy.

Basal cell carcinoma

Basal cell carcinoma is the most common type of skin cancer. It rarely metastasizes or kills, but it is still considered malignant because it can cause significant destruction and disfigurement by invading surrounding tissues. Statistically, approximately 3 out of 10 Caucasians develop a basal cell cancer within their lifetime. In 80 percent of all cases, basal cell cancers are found on the head and neck. There appears to be an increase in the incidence of basal cell cancer of the trunk (torso) in recent years.

Squamous cell carcinoma

Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a form of cancer of the carcinoma type that may occur in many different organs, including the skin, lips, mouth, esophagus, urinary bladder, prostate, lungs, vagina, and cervix. It is a malignant tumor of squamous epithelium (epithelium that shows squamous cell differentiation). Despite the common name, these are unique cancers with large differences in manifestation and prognosis.